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Photographs Archives - Page 2 of 3 - Simon Carter's Onsight Photography

Queensland – Frog

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When we were up in Queensland we split our time between all the Sunshine Coast crags, which I covered in the previous post, and Frog Buttress, which I will quickly cover here.

Best known for the incredible concentration of high-quality crack routes, Frog also has a lot of high-quality face climbing.

Peter Slarke, Deliverance (23).

Mary Moloney, Magical Mystery Tour (19).

Sorry I can’t show you more of my photos from here at the moment, they will be appearing in a feature article soon…

At Frog I employed my Photo Pole apparatus, Photo pole 2.0, for the first time. A few modifications have made it a lot faster and better to work with, compared to the previous design. Here I set it up to shoot Duncan Steel on Whistling Kite. The results were awesome, stay tuned for when my new Australia book comes out to see those.

Me and my photo pole thingy v2.0 at Frog Buttress. Photo John J O’Brien.

Frog Buttress, not the only one but another great reason to visit Queensland for climbing!

Queensland – Sunshine

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A few months ago I mentioned that we were up in Queensland shooting and climbing. A lot of the shooting that I was doing on that trip is for a new coffee-table book on Australian climbing, among other things, but the other big project I was working on was a guidebook to several crags in South East Queensland. There were so many times when we were travelling around up there that I wished there was already a guidebook like this, so I’m sure this new guidebook will be a handy thing for many climbers. The guidebook is a collaborative effort with several local climbers but more on the guidebook later. The result for me was that as soon as we returned from Queensland I basically locked myself in the office and spent the last two months in full-on guidebook production mode. For a while it was a nice change to spend some time at home and have a bit of break from travel for while. Producing guidebooks is really satisfying but it’s not my main business and so when I work on one I don’t have the luxury to spend years pottering away at it; I need to fit guidebook production in between trips. The upshot has been that I’ve had my head down and been focused, neglected blogging and even emails, but because I was working with a great team we got the job done and the book should be in the shops before Christmas. Psyched!

So anyway, here is then a little photo essay on our trip up to Queensland. It really is an awesome winter climbing destination.

We arrived in time to compete in the Queensland Bouldering Competition, it was a really fun event run by Urban Climb. Somehow I managed to snake my way into second place in the mens Masters category. Don’t know how I managed that but it’s good to know this carcass still has a little crank left in it even if you wouldn’t know it judging by my performance on rock of late… But of course we were up there for real rock. We split our time between Frog Buttress and the crags up on the Sunshine Coast north of Brisbane. Frog Buttress is famous for its amazing crack lines of course; there were photos that I wanted to do there and Monique found a project but more on that later. The great surprise for me this trip was just how much great climbing there is up on the Sunshine Coast so I’ll start there… Just an hour north of Brisbane you have the amazing Glass House Mountains:

This is Mount Tibrogargan , the largest of the Glass House Mountains. There is a huge variety of climbing on Tibrogargan. Slider is a high-quality sport sector down in the shade on the left, the patch of orange just to the right of that is Celestial Wall, and the orange up high is the wickedly overhung Summit Caves.

John J O’Brien on the classic Squealer (23), Upper Slider Wall, Mount Tibrogargan.

Monique Forestier on the third (crux) pitch of the four pitch Aphelion (22) on Celestial Wall, Mount Tibrogargan.

John J O’Brien got this shot of me abseiling into position for a shoot on Clemency Wall, Mount Tibrogargan.

And the result from the shoot…

Rob Saunders, Caritas (22) on Clemency Wall, Mount Tibrogargan.

And some antics up in the Summit Caves…

John O’Brien nails the throw first shot to save Lee Cujes from being stranded off his A Gaze Blank and Pitiless as the Sun (30), Summit Caves, Mount Tibrogargan.

And Mount Coolum is a well-known sport climbing crag super close to the beautiful Sunshine Coast beaches. The climbing is funky and requires a lot of knee-bars. People seem to either love it or hate it, Monique loved it.

Alex Straw attempting the “Taking Care of Business” project at Mount Coolum.

Daniel Friedman attempting Evil Wears No Pants (30), Mount Coolum.

And from the belay John O’Brien got another shot of me at work. That’s me on the right and Phil Box on the left.

Good times at Coolum. Coco was so inspired she strummed out a few chords and hummed out somes tunes for her first album.

And close to Noosa there is the generally, but not entirely, slabby Mount Tinbeerwah with a swag of good routes.

Mount Tinbeerwah.

Rob Saunders, Avatar (19), Mount Tinbeerwah.

Nearby we jigged and poked our way two pitches up Mount Cooroora to get some shots of a stunning arête which John O’Brien (JJ) had established.

John J O’Brien, Ill Gotten Gains (26), Mount Cooroora.

And if you head a bit further north there’s a popular bunch of sandstone crags at Brooyar.

Little Wednesday (25) is not to be missed, especially if like Monique you’re already done its Blue Mountains namesake Big Wednesday.

Sabina Allemann, The Great Devoid (22), Brooyar.

So much great climbing! But you know, one of the things I really loved about the Sunshine Coast was that there was more than just the climbing. It’s a beautiful place to visit and hang out. I’m already looking forward to escaping next winter and heading north again, putting the new guidebook to use, and gosh, hopefully having a holiday!

Those beaches! Coco and I at Noosa. Photo John O’Brien (check out his blog).

So until next year, a big shout of thanks to John J O’Brien, Sandra Phoenix, Rob and Donna Saunders, and everyone else who helped make our trip up there so awesome!

un-BEERWAH-lievable!

By | Climbing News, Photographs | One Comment

Busy times indeed, hence why things have been quiet on the blog here. My apologies for that. We recently did a trip up to Queensland and absolutely loved it — but were working our little arses off however. I was mainly shooting for a new coffee-table book on Australian climbing and also a new guidebook project we have in the works. I’m delighted with my photos and satisfied that after all these years I now have some good coverage of Queensland’s awesome, varied and really interesting climbing. Between all the work Monique managed to squeeze in a send of the iconic Whistling Kite (32) at Frog Buttress. More on all those things soon but now I wanted to quickly fire of a quick news report because today I heard some very cool news…

One of the things I photographed up in Queensland was Lee Cujes and John J O’Brien (“JJ”) attempting to free climb the first two pitches of the Beerwah Bolt Route on Mount Beerwah in the Glasshouse Mountains. For those not familiar with it, the Beerwah Bolt Route (aka Stainless Anticlimb) is a famous, no, THE famous, four pitch aid bolt ladder blasting up to – and through – the massive overhangs on the mountain’s north face. It is so popular it’s pretty much a rite-of-passage for Queensland rock climbers. Photographing Lee trying to free climb the second pitch (it was his first time trying the moves) was a laugh actually — the moves looked absolutely ridiculous! I thought “good luck with that”. Lee did all the moves that day but it looked to me like he was settling in for a long-term project – and a very cool one at that. But not so! I just got news that Lee and JJ returned to the route today and fired the first and second pitches at around grade 26 and 27 respectively. Well done guys, absolutely awesome job. I think Queensland just got a couple more mega-classic hard free pitches. And I’d just like to add that I had a look at the massive overhangs and I’m pretty sure they will also go free, just at grade 40 or thereabouts, so maybe we’ll have to wait a bit longer for that.

Here a few pics of the route from the distance. My best work from the shoot might soon be appearing in a magazine, book, or as a limited edition print, so stay tuned for that.

Lee Cujes and John J O'Brien attempting to free climb pitch two of the Beerwah Bolt Route.

Lee Cujes and John J O’Brien attempting to free climb pitch two of the Beerwah Bolt Route.

The first two pitches, now free. From there the aid route traverses right a ways before blasting straight through the big overhangs.

 

Dave, Ian & Nalle

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Oh dear, where did the last few months go? While this blog has been quiet I’ve been busy with travel, photos, climbing, and lots of different work projects going on. Clearly, I’ve got some catching up to do, so here is a quick start.

Back in June I did a quick (maybe 10 day) trip down to Victoria. First stop Melbourne to present my show at the Annual General Meeting of the New Zealand Alpine Club; it was a small but appreciative audience and I really enjoyed the night. Next I blasted over to “The Garapiles” (The Grampians and Arapiles) – one of my favourites parts of the world — for six days of shooting. Always too long between drinks, there never seems to be an end to all the things that I want to shoot — let alone climb — down there. I spent a couple of days working on a photo project at Arapiles (more on that later) but the highlight for me was catching up with Dave Graham, Ian Dory (both from the USA) and Nalle Hukkataival (Finland) for a few days shooting in the Grampians. This was their second visit to Australia after a long trip out here last year. I always like hearing when foreign climbers get really psyched on Oz climbing and so I was keen to meet them and see what they were up to. Uber-strong climbers of course, no surprises there from what I knew, but also genuinely friendly, positive, open and down to earth, which I really appreciated. I really enjoyed my time with them and their friends Madeleine and Remy from Melbourne. And yep, on the rock they were crushing!

Here are a few pics that I can show at this time. We started with a day at Muline Crag where Dave had sent Flower Power (33) second shot. The route has been around for nine years yet I think Dave may have made only the second ascent.

Dave Graham on Flower Power (33 or 8c), which he sent second shot, at Muline Crag, Grampians, Victoria, Australia.

Dave on Flower Power (33) at Muline Crag.

Ian Dory sending Daemon Flower (31), Muline Crag, The Grampians, Victoria, Australia.

Ian sending Daemon Flower (31), Muline Crag.

Then we spent a long day (and some of the night!) on the boulders at Buandik and they sent several new problems that day. Nalle’s Knowing is Half the Battle (V11) is an insane high-ball — about 12-metres high! Both Dave and Ian stepped up and climbed it too.

Nalle Hukkataival, first ascent of Rootarted (V12), Buandik boulders, Grampians, Victoria, Australia.

Nalle making the first ascent of Rootarted (V12), Buandik boulders.

Ian Dory attempting an unclimbed V14ish problem, Buandick boulders.

Ian attempting an unclimbed V14ish problem, Buandik boulders.

Nalle Hukkataival, first ascent of Knowing is Half The Battle (V11 highball), Buandik boulders, Grampians, Victoria, Australia.

Nalle making the first ascent of the high-ball Knowing is Half The Battle (V11), Buandik boulders.

Dave Graham making the most of good conditions after dark(!), attempting, Right Thurr (V13) Buandik boulders, Grampians, Victoria, Australia.

Dave keeping the motivation going long after dark to attempt Right Thurr (V13), Buandik boulders.

And we had a beautiful afternoon up on the glorious orange rock of Millennium Caves, over-looking the Victoria Range.

Ian Dory onsighting Nomads, Saints and Indians (29), Millennium Caves, Grampians, Victoria, Australia.

Ian onsighting the heroically (badly) bolted Nomads, Saints and Indians (29), Millennium Caves.

Nalle Hukkataival working What's an Aging Gigolo to Do (32), Millennium Caves, Grampians, Victoria, Australia.

Nalle climbing the boulder start to What’s an Aging Gigolo to Do (32), Millennium Caves.

Dave Graham working What's an Aging Gigolo to Do (32), Millennium Caves, Grampians, Victoria, Australia.

Dave working What’s an Aging Gigolo to Do (32), Millennium Caves.

Dave Graham flashing Breathing Gasoline (30), Millennium Caves, Grampians, Victoria, Australia.

Dave flashing Breathing Gasoline (30), Millennium Caves.

I headed home but the guys continued to have a productive trip.  Both Dave and Ian climbed The Wheel of Life, the famously long boulder problem in the Hollow Mountain Cave. Dave said a route grade (of 9a+), rather than a boulder grade, was a more appropriate way to grade it given the style and length of the problem, errr, route. When finally the rain held off for long enough Dave sent the run-out Groove Train (33) classic on Taipan Wall. And at nearby Arapiles, Nalle established Never Say Never (V14), perhaps the hardest boulder problem at Arapiles. Still lots to do though, so I hope we’ll see them again next year.

Busy times for Dave Graham, because in other news his new website project The Island has also just launched. With support from a lot of climbers and photographers it is going to be home to lot of really interesting climbing media. Be sure to check it out! Dave has a lot of really good ideas to build a positive online climbing community. I wish him well!

Good Morning

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We are back home now from Spain. I’ll miss the climbing there but being home is not at all bad with the wealth of things to do around here — in Australia. In fact, I’m psyched to do a lot more local climbing and shooting and have several projects I’m excited to be getting stuck into soon. With one of those projects in mind I got out this morning and found it was a beautiful dawn over the Jamison Valley (near Katoomba in the Blue Mountains), with Mount Solitary in the background. You gotta be psyched when a new day — or a new chapter in life — begins like that. Have a great day everyone!

The Jamison Valley, Blue Mountains, blanketed by an inversion layer with Mount Solitary in the background. NSW, Australia.

Fish Eye!

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At last I’m really stoked to announce some good news of our own from Oliana, Spain. On Monday Monique sent Chris Sharma’s uber-classic Fish Eye. It’s her first 8c, or Australian 33, graded route. It proved to be a hard and frustrating process, but I think that just has made it all the more satisfying in the end. Yep – we’re celebrating!

Fish Eye is a very cool looking route blasting straight up the guts of Oliana. It has hard resistance climbing between crux’s and a red-point crux 45-metre’s up the 50-metre route. Monique first tried it on our trip out here last year. She spent enough time on it then to work out the moves start linking long sections. On the second last day of that trip she got really high on the route (on redpoint); it was enough for her to get super-psyched and confident that she could do it.

When we returned this year Monique was fitter than ever but the route did not submit as easily as we had both expected. After two weeks she was getting good linkage. Monique started getting through the main crux about, 28-metres up, and a tricky section above that, more often, and started making it through to the top redpoint crux. It was looking good. I bought some champagne and it waited, chilled, in the fridge. The first few times she fell from the top crux we thought, fine, maybe she doesn’t have the route fitness yet, or maybe she needs to refine the moves there a bit more, but after she came screaming off from there a few more times we really started to wonder “would she ever do it”? Oh no. It was frustrating. Maybe I jinxed it – buying the champas too soon? Getting that high on the route would mean she’d be too gassed for a second shot the same day.

Then the weather intervened, it rained, well flooded, and she had three days enforced rest. It was probably what was needed though — at least for the splits in her fingers to heal. So this time, eh? Errr, no, not to be again. So she took a break for a day and tried Mon Dieu (8a+), which she’d dogged earlier, and ended up sending that. So this time she came back to Fish Eye refreshed. She was looking stronger than ever and made it up to the final rest – below the top crux – again. It was her eighth time up there… but this time she darn well nailed it to perfection. Such a sweet send!

Monique has written about it all too, on her blog here — check it out!

So I lowered Monique off the climb, she got down to the ground and after a few minutes celebrating says “right, what next?”. She was chomping to get on some of the other routes she’d been putting off. “Um, not so fast babe” I say, and sent her back up there for some photos… here’s a few of those – taken right after the send!

Monique Forestier, Fish Eye (8c), Oliana, Catalunya, Spain.

It’s awesome watching — and being able to help — someone’s dreams come true. I know that beyond anything else, Monique was really inspired by this route and she wanted to push her climbing to a new level. Personally, I think it’s also great to see the standards of Australian climbing being raised too. I don’t doubt that Monique has the potential to climb harder too. Will she? Who knows. She’s 39, a mother, does not have any financial sponsors. We are both really grateful that she has at least had this opportunity. Many thanks indeed to everyone who has supported Monique and her climbing! The support she’s received from family, friends, and some gear companies, has really made a huge difference.

Monique Forestier, Fish Eye (8c), Oliana, Catalunya, Spain.

Oliana II

By | Climbing News, General News, Photographs | 2 Comments

So yes, we are back in Catalunya, Spain, for a bit. We had such a good time here last year, we thought, well, why not? And wow, what an amazing time it is to be here. The climbing is great and there has been so much going on, it’s a really fun place to be. The weather has been superb, primo, but last night a storm brought the first rain in weeks and so – thankfully — at last we are having a much-needed rest. It’s a chance for Monique to grow some skin back, and for me to finally write about some of the things that have been going on…

This area is surely the world’s epicentre of hard sport climbing. More than a few of the world’s best sport climbers have been here recently, escaping the colder parts of Europe and North America to enjoy the early spring time conditions at awesome crags – such as Santa Linya, Siurana, Margalef and Oliana. Lots of ultra-hard sends by men and women at these crags have constantly been making the climbing news of late.

Colette McInerney, Mon Dieu (8a+). Oliana.

In fact, if you look at the news coming out of these parts, it’s the women who have dominated it. And rightly so. There is undoubtedly something going on here. Maybe it’s because “resistance” and “endurance” count for so much here. Or because there are some routes which don’t have stopper height-dependant cruxes. Or maybe it’s because the routes are so damn good, long, and inspiring. But whatever it is, the women have stepped it up.

We’ve mostly been climbing at Oliana where, before we arrived, Daila Ojeda succeeded on Mind Control, her first 8c+ (Aus grade 34). This route is the awesome 50-metre resistance crag classic, which I first mentioned here. Soon after I arrived here I did a photo shoot on this route with Daila; here is just one photo from that –  some are going to appear in print soon so I’ll hold off from putting them all on the internet, for now.

Daila Ojeda, Mind Control (8c+), Oliana, Catalunya, Spain.

Daila Ojeda, Mind Control (8c+), Oliana.

Daila has a really smooth climbing style, it was great to see. Brett and Josh Lovell from Big Up Productions are here and have captured some fantastic footage of Daila using an elaborate camera trolley system courtesy of Matt Madaloni and his Sea to Sky Cable Cam, definitely look out for that footage (probably at the Reel Rock Tour).

Daila Ojeda, En Gran Blau (8b+/c), Oliana, Catalunya, Spain.

Daila Ojeda sending En Gran Blau (8b+/c), Oliana.

Dalia achievements have undoubtedly been inspiring to other women. The video of her on Fish Eye drew Monique’s attention to that route, and she’s not the only one. It’s no surprise to me that once one of these classic hard routes receives a female ascent, other women are more likely to have a crack at it. And that’s what has happened on Mind Control. Nina Caprez also climbed Mind Control a few days after Daila and now the floodgates have indeed opened. Since I’ve been here I’ve seen Caroline Ciavaldini and, more recently, Sascha Digiulian also send it — with Sascha smashing it in just two days! Far out brussel sprout! (Has Sascha got a nick-name yet? What about Sascha the Dispatcher?). Eva Lopez was also trying it and will be returning soon. And the uber-strong Russian woman Evgeniya Malamid was making good progress on it before her time here ran out. I’ve seen a few men send it in the meantime too.

Coco, Daila and Sascha sharing beta for Mind Control.

Coco, Daila and Sascha sharing Mind Control beta.

So we have one of the world’s premier crags for ultra-hard sport climbing, in peak season, with some of the best sport climbers in the world coming here — in peak form. The sending spree might surprise some armchair critics, but considering those factors the spree certainly doesn’t surprise me — and it sure has been great to see!


On another note though, I have also noticed something a bit odd here, which could easily give the impression that some of these routes are easier than they are. And that is the way some of these ascents have ended up reported in the climbing media. I first noticed something strange when a climber sent a route second time that they were on the route that day, and their ascent was reported in the media as “second go”, yet the detail about them having been on the route the previous year didn’t make it through to the news report. Another time, a send was reported as “3rd repoint attempt” with no mention of the days spent working the route – of which I’d seen several. Now, I don’t think there is anything deliberately dodgy going on. I asked around and it seems that it’s just a way of reporting accents used by some climbers (probably very much a minority) from some European countries. Fair enough, people will report things in the way they are familiar with, and perhaps some of the detail hasn’t been picked up by the media.

There are a few problems with this though. Firstly, no matter how well intended, if climbers are just highlighting the “shots”, “go’s” or “redpoint attempts”, without the time also spent working the route, and that’s all that gets picked up by the media, then it hardly gives a complete picture. Secondly, it’s not consistent with the way many climbers do report their ascents. And thirdly, and perhaps this one is just me, you know — an old fart, grasping to keep up with the latest lingo jingo, but the different terminology is a little confusing at times. Like, just when is a “try” or a “go” a “shot” – or not? I think I’ve got that a “dog” is a “try” and not a “shot” nor a “go”, let alone an “attempt”. Er what!? Yeah, um maybe I’m a bit confused. Where did I put the Panadol? Anyway, if climbers want to report this stuff then whatever happened to good old-fashioned reporting of “days”, i.e., any day you got on the route – no matter how long or for whatever reason – got counted as a day? It’s not a big problem, and should be easy for the climbing media to get on top of – if they just start querying these sorts of reports.

But I digress. I know the real reason you are reading this blog is to find out how I’ve been going on my latest project, and on that front I am stoked to report that after three weeks of top-roping I managed to send my 7b+ proj on my very first shot! It actually felt easy. Yeah, 7b+, and definitely soft…

:-P

Thanks for reading my blog. More soon!

Nory’s Moonshadow

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Matt “Nory” Norgrove has been making his mark in the Blue Mountains of late. On the rock he has been ripping it up and has steadily accumulated an exceptional tick list of ultra-hard routes: lots of 31’s and 32’s, some rarely repeated, many in fast time — the list is too long to get into here. His enthusiasm, positive attitude, and encouragement of others, is appreciated.

Recently Matt cranked Moonshadow, his first 33 — an awesome achievement! So I coaxed him out for photo shoot on that gnarly rock and worked him till his fingers were raw…

Matthew Norgrove, Moonshadow (33), Centennial Glen, Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia.

Matthew Norgrove, Moonshadow (33), Centennial Glen, Blue Mountains.

Also, below is an older shot that I took of Matt on Mr Line (32). Check out his blog, it’s a good read.

Great job Matt. And thanks for the help with the shots. Keep cranking!

Matt Norgrove, Mt Line (32), Diamond Falls, Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia.

Matt Norgrove, Mt Line (32), Diamond Falls, Blue Mountains.

Rock Climbing Down Under: Australia Exposed is coming Order here now!